install theme
bathorynordland:

Lone reindeer buck by Peter Nijenhuis on Flickr.
superbnature:

Peace by robinjaz http://ift.tt/1pQEDL5

A limerick:

toothlessrebel:

asgardiantelevision:

image

Doesn’t look like a limerick to you? Try this:

A dozen, a gross, and a score
Plus three times the square root of four
Divided by seven
Plus five times eleven
Is nine squared and not a bit more.

THE FUCK FUCK FUCK FUCCCKKKKKKK

replasy:

unamusedsloth:

"Thank you, you’ve been great."

give em the ol razzle dazzle
love-this-pic-dot-com:

How To Get More Ink Out Of Your Printer Ink Cartridge
biodiverseed:

THE FORAGER'S DILEMMA 

Euell Gibbons called it “stalking” in his 1962 best seller, Stalking the Wild Asparagus, which launched the contemporary foraging movement and made him one of my outdoor role models. Like Gibbons, I’ve foraged on the East Coast, mostly for shellfish in Long Island Sound, and on the West Coast, for blackberries, quail eggs, fennel, and much more. But I’ve always thought of myself as a common scavenger rather than as a “forager,” a word redolent of European forests and feudal lords.
Whether one calls it foraging, scavenging, gathering, or stalking, it’s now at a cultural and environmental crossroads. Foraging information has spread through websites, newspapers, magazines, books, and word of mouth. Every year, it seems, more naturalists, foodies, and commercial foragers tromp into woods, fields, and pastures. How many is impossible to say: No one keeps statistics on them, or on the supply of the wild foods they’re seeking. Unlike hunting and fishing, both tightly regulated, foraging–defined roughly as gathering (rather than catching or shooting) wild foods–remains an under-the-radar pursuit.
Still, anecdotal evidence from Bay Area foragers suggests the demand for edible wildflowers, roots, mushrooms, and fruits has grown rapidly. Foraged mushroom are available year-round at specialty shops such as Far West Fungi in San Francisco’s Ferry Building. Cutting-edge chefs seek out rare foraged foods. Fashionable restaurants such as Berkeley’s Chez Panisse retain professional foragers to find nettles, mushrooms, chicory, and other plants.
Foraging is fun and free, and foraged foods are fresh, tasty, and nutritious. They’re the antithesis of the American industrial food system’s processed “food-like substances.” So foraging is great for foragers and diners. But how many foragers can one patch of land sustain? And how do plants, fungi, and animals fare? What, in short, are the ethics of foraging?
Read more

#eat the weeds #foraging #health #sustainability #bioregionalism #the commons
spoopy-sherlock:

giraffesandtheclap:

gsfsoul:

That looks like the “gods” are having a rave in the clouds

all hail the glow cloud

all hail the glow cloud
earthlynation:

(via 500px / The beech marten by Michal Jirouš)

joshpeck:

when someone tells me to calm down when i’m talking about things i’m passionate about

image

image

uxxxie:

got this snapchat from my friend in japan
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